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Kulon

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I was reading the series "Song of Ice and Fire" and I absolutely love it. The problem is that the next book is due to come out sometime in the Fall and I'm dying to read something. I need some advice for a good fantasy series by an author who writes in a similar fashion to George R.R Martin. If you haven't read his work, please just give me some names of the best fantasy you've read.

 

Thanks. ;)

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Have you read:

 

The Hobbit + The Lord of the Rings (J.R.R. Tolkien)

 

Wheel of Time series (Robert Jordan)

 

The Belgariad (David Eddings)

 

The Felix & Gotrek novels (William King)

 

Chronicles of the Cheysuli (Jennifer Robertson)

 

The Dresden Files (Jim Butcher) (modern fantasy)

 

Anita Blake, Vampire Hunter (Laurell K. Hamilton) (modern fantasy)

 

Those are personal favorites. I can scour my shelves for more if you want.

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Some of my favorites:

 

The Codex Alera by Jim Butcher

The Vlad Taltos cycle by Steven Brust

The Deed of Paksennarion by Elizabeth Moon

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Yay! I like this thread. *takes out pen and paper* I've been meaning to go further into the Sword of Truth series, so I'll suggest that one.

 

P.S. Song of Ice and Fire is one of my favs too. I'm glad to hear there's a timeline on it now. Last I knew it was TBA. ;)

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The Black Jewel Trilogy - Anne Bishop

The Book of Aitrus - Rand Miller

The Book of Ti'ana - Rand Miller

The Book of D'ni - Rand Miller

 

Those last three can now be more commonly found in a big single volume called 'The Myst Reader'

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I was thinking of reading the "Wheel of Time" series, but I heard it gets crappy after a while.

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That one IS my favorite. I second Dave's recommendation. ;)

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Well...let's see...some of my favorites have already been named...but here's some more:

 

Stand alone:

 

War of the Flowers, by Tad Williams

The Legend of Nightfall by (I forgot)

The Redemption of Althalas (spelled wrong?) by ?Eddings?

 

Series:

 

The Black Company, by Glen Cook

Through the Darkness, by Harry Turtledove

The Videssos Cycle (And the other Videssos novels: Tale of Krispos, etc) by Harry Turtledove

Any series by Raymond Fiest set in Midkemia (he wrote a lot of them, not just Magician)

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The Book of Aitrus - Rand Miller

The Book of Ti'ana - Rand Miller

The Book of D'ni - Rand Miller

 

Those last three can now be more commonly found in a big single volume called 'The Myst Reader'

 

 

I am currently re-reading those at this moment, on to book 2 of the series.

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I've been meaning to go further into the Sword of Truth series, so I'll suggest that one.

 

 

The Sword of Truth series goes something like this...

 

Wizard's First Rule - Great read.

Stone of Tears - Not as good as the first but still enjoyable.

Blood of the Fold - Ditto.

Temple of the Winds - Boring at first but picks up after awhile.

Soul of the Fire - Painful to read.

Faith of the Fallen - As good as the first book.

The Pillars of Creation - I've never wanted a main character to die quite as much as when I read this. Also, the book is bad.

Naked Empire - Why am I reading this shit?

Chainfire, Phantom, Confessor - Fun for the stupid fluff that it is.

 

At a certain point, you're just reading it because you're invested in the characters. Richard becomes an annoying preacher and the main villain is one-dimensional and unrealistically evil.

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If you've never read the wheel of time, I'd say dig right in there.

 

 

If you want to go a little crazy, I've got a big thick book full of H.P. Lovecraft stories. It's not for everyone though.

 

WoT imo!

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Wheel of Time it is.

 

Thank you so much guys. :D

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Wheel of Time it is.

 

Thank you so much guys. :D

 

Yep, the first, oh, say, 5? 6? WoT books are fantastic. After that, though, you may want to have someone Cliffs Notes it for you until Sanderson finishes the final trilogy.

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The name of the Rochester Dagorhir chapter should give you a clue that I'm a GRRM fan.

 

For more good reading, check out Elizabeth Moon's, "The Deed of Paksenarion".

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While I am also prone to pick sci fi and fantasy novels for leisure reading, I also enjoy historical fiction and some favorites of reading groups. Belonging to a local book club has expanded my horizons a bit and encouraged me to read genres and books I would normally ignore, with some very pleasant results.

 

Try:

The Historian by Elizabeth Costova

Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden

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For more good reading, check out Elizabeth Moon's, "The Deed of Paksenarion".

 

LOVE this series. I'm on my second copy of the omnibus edition, and it's spine is broken in a half dozen places. One of my all-time favorites...

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Yep, the first, oh, say, 5? 6? WoT books are fantastic. After that, though, you may want to have someone Cliffs Notes it for you until Sanderson finishes the final trilogy.

I rather like the 7th as well, I think it really starts downhill on the 8th. But you've heard me fangirl about WoT enough to know that I'll be talking your ear off now that you're reading them. We have 2 copies of the entire series so far (mine and Kev's, lol), if you want to borrow any at some point ;D

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Wheel of Time until Dumai Wells is amazing. It turns awful afterwards.

Black Company by Glen Cook is awesome story, mediocre writing.

The Darkness that Comes Before, by R. Scott Bakker is dense, but has brilliant payoffs.

The Malazan series by Steven Erickson is probably the best military fantasy I've read, also very dense.

John Carter of Mars, Edgar Rice Burroughs. Damsels, monsters, sci-fi with swords, Mars, awesome. Pulp at it's finest.

The Lions of Al'Rassan by Guy Gavriel Kay is fun, a pseudo fantasy spin on the Reconquista.

Guardians of the Flame by Joel Rosenberg is a great series -- what if you got sucked into your fantasy world. Note: Not happy.

Tomoe Gozen by Jessica Salmonsen, badass chick samurai in mystic Japan. Mandatory Snow Goblin reading, IMO.

Seconds and thirds to the Paksenarrion rec's. Good shit there.

The original Dragonlance trilogy, Weis and Hickman, is still a fun read.

The original Shanara series (Sword, Elfstones, Wishsong) has some iconic characters. Terry Brooks is the author.

For weird and fun sci fi, check out Jack Vance. The Alastor trilogy is awesome, and nobody can be as intellectually sarcastic as his characters.

Dude, Conan, Robert E Howard. There's four? five? collections of his stuff currently in print

If you can find it, Artesia by Mark Smylie. Gorgeous comic, intricate story, vivid sex and violence.

Mouse Guard, by David Peterson. Another comic, looks cute, then goes badass.

Okko, by Hub, more mandatory Snow Goblin reading. Gorgeous comic with a serpentine Kurosawa-worthy plot.

Foundation trilogy, by Asimov. Not all sci-fi stories need to be solved by lasers. Instead, they are solved by the maths.

 

Okay, that's enough.

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I also like Larry Niven's Ringworld series, there's five or six of 'em now.

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Even though the peanut gallery has basically finished, I figured I'd add in my picks =)

 

As for series' I like the Nine Princes in Amber books (of which there are ten) by Roger Zelazny. It just unfortunate that he died in the middle of the second story arc =( But my all-time favorite is probably Stranger in a Strange Land by Frank Herbert.

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Oh, if you're not "stuck" on pure fantasy, let me suggest a few others...

 

 

William Gibson - Neuromancer, Count Zero, Mona Lisa Overdrive

James Clavell (Historical Fiction) - Any and all his books, but particularly: Shogun, Tai-pan

David Ball (Historical Fiction) - The Sword and the Scimitar

Ken Follett (Historical Fiction) - Pillars of the Earth, World Without End (sequel)

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Stranger in a Strange Land = Heinlein, not Herbert. :)

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Stranger in a Strange Land = Heinlein, not Herbert. :)

 

Though the Dune series is really good, too (Herbert).

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I am a big fan of Lois McMaster Bujold. She has an extensive space opera series called the Vorkosigan Saga, which is a nice mix of cool characters, space adventure, and moral themes centered around the different space cultures and technologies. She also has a fantasy trilogy, starting with the Curse of Chalion, which is a really neat world. I love the theology in it especially, but the characters are awesome. The second book, Paladin of Souls, is one of my comfort reads and a favorite. I haven't gotten into the The Sharing Knife series yet, which is her most current.

 

I've been reading a lot of Terry Pratchett / Discworld lately. My favorites of his are Monstrous Regiment, Night Watch, and Small Gods. He is prolific, but some of the books are better than others. The good news is that it doesn't seem to matter much if you read them in order. They are silly, quick reads, but fun and sometimes insightful.

 

I just finished Roverandom by J.R.R. Tolkien, which is a short children's story that is entirely disconnected from Middle Earth, describing the adventures of a dog who bites a wizard and gets cursed, and has to find a way to get out of it. It was fun and fanciful, and I am thinking about picking up LOTR or some of his short stories again. ("Leaf by Niggle," a short story of his, is one of my favorites, again not set in Middle Earth.)

 

I overdosed a little bit on fantasy, so right now I'm reading The Marble Faun by Nathaniel Hawthorne, and listening to On Basilisk Station by David Weber on audiobook (first book of the Honor Harrington series, another space opera).

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