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Ashlin Burnheart

Brigandine/Coat of plates

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I finally got my materials lined up for my armor, but before I get going on half plate I want to work with basic cuting, bending and grinding. a Brigandine/Plate of Coats

 

Couple questions before I throw more money at this project.

 

*Is there really a difference between the two?

 

*How large do I have to make the plates? (Is there a normal/average length and width)

 

*What backing materials are passable in the Novitas system?

 

 

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Plate of coats? :P

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There are a number of different patterns for a Coat of Plates.

 

Most CoPs are based on patterns found at the battle of Wisby: http://www.hoashantverk.se/hantverk/hoas_rustningar/index.html

 

Any period backing material is legal at KoN, as long as your metal meets our requirements.

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*Is there really a difference between the two?

There is no totally clear distinction as to what is a coat of plates, and what is a brigandine, since one evolved from the other. Rule of thumb: A coat of plates has large plates, and when worn makes your body a bit barrel-shaped, a brigandine has small plates and conforms to the contours of your body much better.

 

In German we even have a term for a third type of armor inbetween those two types (Lentner), which makes that question for us even more confusing ;)

 

*How large do I have to make the plates? (Is there a normal/average length and width)

I'd recommend to choose any of the historical models (Quite a few of them survived to this day, with the battle of Wisby probably the best source for Coats of Plates), and just go with that. They go from their beginnings in the 13th century with maybe 4-6 large plates riveted into a tabard to late medieval models with several hundreds.

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Plate of coats? tongue.gif

 

AHHHH!!!!! i knew i was goiung to do that XD

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The first attempt will probably be on linen or wool. This armor is meant to be quiet, flexible, light and easy to fix or adjust. I plan to use smaller plates for flexibly and stress on the pockets they will be placed in..2 layers of linen or wool as for the backing, one layer for the front. The metal is 18 gauge aluminum. Any pointers, tips, or tricks before I get going?

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I don't recommend wool as a backing for this kind of armor as it could stretch out with all that metal hanging from it. Usually, this kind of armor is constructed using a mixture of leater and linen, with leather giving some structural strength, and the linen preventing any holes in the leather to stretch out.

 

Not quite sure what you mean by using "pockets". You want to sew pockets to put metal plates in, which you then sew into the "body" of the armor?

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Its the instructions that "Hanzo of Narnia" posted. I will try to fix the link tomorrow.

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I'm familiar with Hanzo's instructions, I'm not sure where you're getting the idea of "Pockets" though.

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It was for was reinforcement. I am kind of making it up as I go along. biggrin.gif

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It was for was reinforcement. I am kind of making it up as I go along. biggrin.gif

 

Well, stop it. There is plenty of information on how to do this correctly available all over the internet.

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Well, stop it. There is plenty of information on how to do this correctly available all over the internet.

 

I know, I have done my homework. this is not suppose to be a big deal, I was hoping that someone on this forum had worked with armor like this could spend sometime walking me through the right in wrongs. I trust people I know over random internet sites.

 

I am not the type of person who wants to blow or has the time/materials for trial and error. That's why this post came up in the first place.I would like to know why what I am thinking is wrong though. I need to start somewhere. So please if there is anything besides just look online because that's the best information you can give me. Like not using cotton, or if duck cloth is legal, or if canvas is legal.

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You're gonna need to have a little trial and error, if you've never riveted steel to cloth before you'll want to practice.

 

I made a CoP using leather backing because I screwed up the cloth I had set up.

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No pockets, and if you're going with linen, you'll absolutely need 2 layers. When I made mine (following Hanzo's instructions), I made myself a special awl that helped a LOT. Get yourself an old screwdriver that the tip has chipped or stripped and cut the first inch off. Grind that till it's pointy and sharp, then file the tip off so it's not quite so sharp anymore. Sand it till its smooth all over. The idea is you want it to open the holes between the threads of linen without tearing them. Use a spinning motion as you jab it through and you'll be less likely to damage the fibers in the linen.

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