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Maggie / Baevynn

Fabric Patterns

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So, I was going through some random bits of garb from other time periods and seeing what would be usable and I thought of something: Are stripes period? What about little flowers? Gingham?

 

In game, I've only really seen tartan and Asian styled floral embroidery or printing.

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I'll let our history buffs offer the definitive answer, but Wikipedia leads me to believe that the answer is no - jacquard looms and patterned weaving were a much later thing, historically.

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Stripes are historical, but would be more expensive than plain woven fabrics, less expensive than printed fabrics .

 

 

The scale (Historically) would work like this, from cheep to expensive Natural color (undied) , died fabric (dull tones cheaper than bright ones) , striped fabrics, printed fabrics, embroidered fabrics.

 

Historically, from cheep to expensive the types of fabric would be Linen, wool, cotton, silk

 

Now, these are generalizations based on historical patterns- cotton, for example, was expensive before the 1800's and cheep afterward because of the invention of the cotton gin- has such a device (or its magical equivalent) been invented in Novitas? Who knows.

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Anything worn on game of thrones would be good right?

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Most florals from that time period are really simplified and more or less a symbol, like a fleur-de-lis is actually supposed to represent a lily. 99% of floral fabric you find in the store, would be inaccurate. http://www.pinterest.com/scasocial/as-textiles/ Here's some period fabric designs for research.

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Re: Game of Thrones - Yes, except the damn funnel dress.

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Most florals from that time period are really simplified and more or less a symbol, like a fleur-de-lis is actually supposed to represent a lily. 99% of floral fabric you find in the store, would be inaccurate. http://www.pinterest...al/as-textiles/ Here's some period fabric designs for research.

I agree, it's very hard to find period-accurate patterned fabrics. I know a store that sells them - but for ~100-200€/meter. Like this one.

 

Both printed fabrics (linen, wool - afaik 1200 onwards) as well as embroidered silk (first imported from china, later with patterns copied in italian silk) could get quite elaborate, but there is scarce evidence that those fabrics were ever worn by anyone buth highest nobility and clergy members. Most remaining examples come from cloth used for clerical purposes, for example to decorate and contain holy relics.

 

While there is ample evidence for striped or checkered cloth in general, at least in western and central europe it doesn't seem to have been used much. Maybe it was not terribly fashionable among nobility, which most contemporary images depicted? This picture for example shows the knight and poet Neidhart (in plain-colored, but embroidered clothing) surrounded by vassals/servants in striped clothing. (~1300)

 

As for the price, cloth patterned this way can't have been any more expensive than plain colored cloth, as both the material used as well as the work needed to make it (use differently colored threads in regular intervals on the loom) is basically identical.

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The real difficulty you are going to have with most of these fabrics is that unlike modern stripes, florals, etc (which are printed on in some way) most period patterns would have been woven in or embroidered on (ignore this for Gersh, where they made all kinds of crazy silk woven in or dyed after).

 

Regardless of how authentic the specific design of the print is, most modern people aren't perfect history buffs with a tiny calendar of exact dates in their heads, and the biggest thing you can do to make a print read as authentic is to avoid anything actually printed on. If you already know a lot about this stuff there are exceptions but if not better to skip those; they will look lousy.

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One reason knitting became popular in the Middle Ages was the fact that you could do colorful patterns (especially stripes) FAR more easily than with weaving. I'd be careful that it doesn't look too modern (yeah, there are knit caps that haven't changed in 400 years, but most people see a beanie and think "modern") but knits where the actual strands are different colors are a good potential start.

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